Review Criteria

All submitted manuscripts will be evaluated based upon the following criteria. These criteria are also available in pdf format.


Research Articles:

Research articles include 15-25 page manuscripts (4,000 - 7,000 words) that are theoretical or empirical in nature. Research articles are to be well grounded in the relevant literature and present knowledge, methods, and insights relevant to higher education pedagogy. The broad scope of the journal and its diverse readership necessitates that research articles address issues that have a wide appeal and significance to higher education practioners.

  1. Focus: Is the research manuscript's focus in congruence with the stated mission and foci of the journal? Specifically, all research manuscripts should focus on the study, development, application, and evaluation of higher education pedagogy.
  2. Problem: Does the research manuscript clearly state and explain the problem or issue that is addressed by the completed research? This statement of the problem should be directly linked with and in alignment with the subsequent review of the literature.
  3. Literature: Does the research manuscript identify the research that led the manuscript author(s) to propose the research completed, and has/have the author(s) indicated how the current manuscript adds to the previous research?
  4. Methodology: Is the methodology described in the research manuscript well developed, clearly articulated, and appropriate given the expressed problem, literature support, and research approach (e.g., qualitative or quantitative)?
  5. Analysis: Are the data that are collected, regardless of form (e.g., interview transcripts, achievement test scores, survey results), analyzed using appropriate procedures and are the results of these analyses reported accurately and fully within the research manuscript?
  6. Conclusions: Are the conclusions discussed by the author(s) in the research manuscript supported by the data analysis? In addition, does the conclusion address both the original problem and the implications of the research findings?
  7. Cross-disciplinary: Does the manuscript, either through the nature of the problem or the discussion of the results, reach beyond a single discipline or domain and address the applicability of the problem and results to higher education pedagogy, in general?
  8. Organization: Is the research manuscript organized in accordance with current accepted formats for reporting qualitative or quantitative research? In addition, all quantitative research manuscripts should follow the latest version of the APA guidelines.
  9. Writing: Is the manuscript free from grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors, and is the manuscript written in an appropriate style? Uncertain issues of format or style should be answered using the latest version of the APA style guidelines.
  10. Format: Does the manuscript conform to the organization, style, and format guidelines set forth by the latest version of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association?


Instruction Articles:

Instructional articles are 10-20 page manuscripts (3,000 - 6,000 words) designed to explain and clarify innovative higher education teaching methods. Instructional articles, while grounded in the literature on higher education pedagogy, focus on the explanation of tentative, emerging, or alternative teaching methodologies, rather than the strict reporting of empirical data.

  1. Focus: Is the instructional manuscript's focus in congruence with the stated mission and foci of the journal? Specifically, all instructional manuscripts should focus on the study, development, application, and evaluation of higher educational pedagogy.
  2. Problem: Does the instructional manuscript clearly state and explain the problem or issue that is to be addressed by the instructional method discussed later in the article? This statement of the problem should be directly linked with and in alignment with the subsequent review of the literature.
  3. Literature: Does the instructional manuscript identify prior methods used to address the instructional problem at hand and has the author(s) indicated how the current manuscript adds to the body of knowledge to address the problem?
  4. Pedagogy: Is the pedagogy described in the instructional manuscript well developed, clearly articulated, and appropriate given the expressed problem and literature support? The pedagogy description should be clear enough that others who may wish to adopt the pedagogy may do so.
  5. Analysis: Is it clear how the pedagogy described in the instructional manuscript addressed the instructional problem at hand?
  6. Conclusions: Are the conclusions discussed by the author(s) in the instructional manuscript supported by the analysis? In particular, are the conclusions logically consistent and do they logically follow from the problem statement, the literature, the pedagogy, and the analysis?
  7. Cross-disciplinary: Does the instructional manuscript, either through the nature of the problem or the discussion of the results, reach beyond a single discipline or domain and address the applicability of the pedagogy and results to higher education pedagogy, in general?
  8. Organization: Is the instructional manuscript organized in accordance with currently accepted formats for reporting pedagogical methods? In particular, is there a logical flow to the ideas presented therein?
  9. Writing: Is the instructional manuscript free from grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors and is the manuscript written in an appropriate style? Uncertain issues of format or style should be answered using the latest version of the APA style guidelines.
  10. Format: Does the instructional manuscript conform to the organization, style, and format guidelines set forth by the latest version of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association?


Review Articles:

Review articles are 3-5 page manuscripts (1,000 - 1,500 words) that include commentaries and evaluations of recently published works - books, articles, or web sites - related to higher education pedagogy.

  1. Focus: Is the manuscript and the material reviewed (e.g., books, articles, web pages) in congruence with the stated mission and foci of the journal? Specifically, all review manuscript and materials reviewed should focus on the study, development, application, and evaluation of higher education pedagogy.
  2. Problem: Does the review manuscript clearly state and explain the problem or issue that is addressed by the reviewed material? This statement of the problem should be directly linked with and in alignment with the subsequent discussions of the reviewed material's contents and evaluation.
  3. Contents: Does the review article adequately describe and explain the contents of the reviewed materials? The descriptions and explanations should include both what is addressed and what is missing.
  4. Evaluation: Is the material reviewed evaluated with special attention given to the material's significance and applicability to higher education pedagogy? In addition, does the evaluation link the currently reviewed material to existing, but similar, materials?
  5. Conclusions: Are the conclusions discussed by the author(s), in the review manuscript, supported by the discussions of the content and subsequent evaluations?
  6. Cross-disciplinary: Does the manuscript, either through the nature of the problem or the discussion of the results, reach beyond a single discipline or domain and address the applicability of the problem and results to higher education pedagogy, in general?
  7. Organization: Is the review manuscript organized in a logical and readable format?
  8. Writing: Is the manuscript free from grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors, and is the manuscript written in an appropriate style? Uncertain issues of format or style should be answered using the latest version of the APA style guidelines.
  9. Format: Does the manuscript conform to the organization, style, and format guidelines set forth by the latest version of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association?




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